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The Nation's Premier Youth Health & Safety Organization
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Social Media Toolkit – OH

Social Media Toolkit – OH

How to Use Social Media to Promote Safe Driving and Ohio SADD

Why Use Social Media?

You can use social media to effectively share information and stories directly with teens who are interested in the dangers of distracted driving.  As you begin to plan your Ohio SADD activity year, think about using social media websites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Pinterest and YouTube. Not only can they help increase the number of teens who see your messages about the dangers of distracted driving, social media posts can increase attendance at your events, raise awareness of Ohio SADD and may even save a life.

Be sure to check out the Ohio SADD website at (URL) each month to get updates on local and statewide programs, events, resources, news and information that can be helpful to you and your social media outreach.

You can connect with Ohio SADD on the following social media sites:

Remember that social media is more powerful if you are an active, ongoing user.

Be creative with your content. Post interesting videos, pictures and stories to help promote your local Ohio SADD activities and events. Encourage your local Ohio SADD members to post to their social media sites as well.

Please, do not create your own Ohio SADD Facebook page, group or profile for your local Ohio SADD events. This can get very confusing for social media users. Instead, connect to the Ohio SADD social media sites and post your messages, photos, comments there.  If you “like” the Ohio SADD page from your personal Facebook page, your posts on the Ohio SADD page will appear on your personal page.

Easy Ways to Promote your Ohio SADD Support

Post pictures of student drivers having fun at your local events. Post the “Ohio SADD” the “You Are The Key” and “PROMise a Safe Summer” logos on your social media sites.

Post photos to Twitter using Twitpic. When posting on Twitter, try to use the #OhioSADD

Share Videos and Photos

Go to the Ohio SADD YouTube Channel and share video clips from your event. Click “share” after uploading the video and select Ohio SADD as the social media website you wish to post it to.

Create a video/or photo slideshow about your event. Share this video on YouTube and post it to social media websites such as Facebook.

Link to Ohio SADD’s newest YouTube video featuring Ohio students sharing the important “You are the Key” message.

Post Links

Repost Ohio SADD stories on your Facebook and Twitter pages.

Share links from the Ohio SADD website using the “share this” feature in the upper right-hand corner of each page.

Create a Facebook Event

Create an event by clicking “events” on the left side of your Facebook page and then create a new event. Fill in the event details for your local event and invite all of your Facebook friends to attend.

Sample Facebook Posts

  • Car crashes are the top killer of teens like you and me.  Alcohol, speeding and texting while driving can lead to tragedy. You are the key to safe driving. Learn more at www.OhioSADD.com
  • Remember, you are the key to preventing crashes from happening. Be a responsible driver. Buckle up, park the cell phone and pay attention to the road. Learn more at  www.OhioSADD.com
  • Find out how to drive on Ohio’s roads more safely. Most crashes occur at busy intersections. Learn more atwww.OhioSADD.com
  • In rural areas, single car crashes are common and deadly. Avoid alcohol, speeding and texting while driving. Learn more at www.OhioSADD.com
  • Did you know that about 38% of all serious injuries in Ohio occur at intersections? Stay alert, slow down, don’t run lights.  Learn more at www.OhioSADD.com
  • Just read that about 40% of all fatalities involve motorists who hit trees, utility poles and other roadside objects. Remember don’t drive while fatigued, drinking or talking on the phone. Learn more at www.OhioSADD.com
  • Attention teen drivers!  Did you know that Ohio law banned texting while driving effective August 30, 2012? Learn more at www.OhioSADD.com
  • Did you know that teen drivers will lose their license and pay a hefty fine if they text while driving in Ohio? Learn more at www.OhioSADD.com

For TWITTER

Since Twitter posts are limited to 140 characters (including spaces) and hyperlinks are often long, you should post “short links” in your Twitter posts. To do this, go to http://bit.ly and register for free by creating a username and password.

Once registered, you can copy and paste the link and click “shorten.”  It will give you a short link that you can post and also a box that says “share.” You can type your tweet in that box and it will post directly to your Twitter page.

Bit.ly also tracks the number of times your link is ‘clicked,’ so you will know what types of news your followers are interested in, the number of unique visitors that were directed to that link, as well as the number of visitors that reposted that link.

Sample Tweets

  • EVENT visitors pledge to avoid distracted driving.  Come out on DATES. www.OhioSadd.com  #OhioSADD
  • Cell phone use increases driver reaction time as much as alcohol. Remember to park you phone while driving. www.OhioSadd.com #OhioSADD
  • The leading source of driver inattention is use of a wireless device. www.OhioSadd.com  #OhioSADD
  • Drivers using cell phones are 4 Xs as likely to get into serious crashes w/ injuries. www.OhioSadd.com #OhioSADD
  • 10% of drivers aged 16 to 24 years old are on their phone at any one time. Park yours when driving.www.OhioSadd.com #OhioSADD
  • Distracted Driving is a factor in 25% of police reported crashes. www.OhioSadd.com #OhioSADD
  • Using a cell phone reduces brain activity associated with driving by 37% www.OhioSadd.com #OhioSADD

Tips for Avoiding Single Car Crashes 

Feel free to use any of these safe driving tips from the Ohio Department of Transportation www.dot.state.oh.us/groups/everymove/Pages/default.aspx.

  1. Be alert.  If fatigued, pull over to a rest stop or drink a caffeinated beverage.
  2. Avoid distractions while driving like talking on the cell phone, texting, eating, grooming or adjusting the radio.
  3. Watch your speed, especially when conditions are wet or icy.
  4.  Always wear your seat belt.  It’s the law in Ohio.
  5. Be aware of horizontal curves in the road. Slow your speed.
  6. Be aware of shoulder drop offs at the edge of the road.
  7. Obey passing regulations.  A solid yellow line means no passing.
  8.  Don’t overreact if you run off the road. Firmly grip the steering wheel and gently steer your vehicle back to the road.  Abruptly braking or using the accelerator can make the problem worse.
  9.   Drive with your bright lights on at night when no traffic is approaching.
  10. Pay attention to speed limits – they are there for a reason and are an important warning of unusual conditions.

Texting While Driving is Illegal for Ohio Teens. You Could Lose You License, Or Even Your Life!

Use posts on social media sites to remind drivers that for anyone under age 18, it’s illegal to use any mobile communications device while driving in Ohio. This means, for anyone under age 18, it’s illegal to text, email, talk on your mobile phone, play video games, use your GPS or iPod while driving — even when sitting at a light or stuck in traffic.

It’s a Primary Offense — the only reason police need to pull you over.

  •        First violation:        $150 fine, driver’s license suspended for 60 days
  •        Second violation:   $300 fine, driver’s license suspended for one year
  •        Exceptions:   Pre-programmed GPS or emergency calls to police, ambulance, fire dept. etc.

For adult drivers, it’s a secondary offense, which means police can only ticket you if you’re pulled over for another traffic violation. Adult drivers face a $150 for texting or reading/sending email.

Read the entire law in this link

Texting While Driving:  How Dangerous is it?

  • Among driving distractions, texting is extremely dangerous because it takes your eyes, hands and attention off the road (Ohio Department of Transportation).
  •  40% of all American teens say they have been in a car when the driver used a cell phone in a way that put people in danger. (Pew research)
  •  About 50 percent of teens surveyed admit to texting while driving (AT&T Poll, 2012).
  •   Texting while driving takes your eyes off the road for about five seconds – At 55 mph, that’s like driving the length of a football field – 100 yards – with your eyes closed (USDOT).
  •  You’re 23 times more likely to crash while texting and driving (VTTI).